Whitney Web Page - Southbridge History & More
Paul Coiteux Collection

Thanks to Paul Coiteux, a long time collector an Southbridge Resident, I am able to share images from his vast collection of Southbridge Memorabilia. I will be adding an item or two every week, so please check back!

Click Here for story of the Marcy St. School Eagles!!! Rev 07-Oct-08
The four Eagles have all been located / Thanks to Evelyn Petrelli for finding the Demolition details!

The CA Dresser House
New Nov 3, 2001


Photo from Paul Coiteux's collection

WWI Homecoming photo if front of the CA Dresser House - later referred to as the Maci Building which burned down
Now the old parking lot on the Corner of Main and Central Streets

The following text was from the Southbridge Journal -
Oct 1896 (Courtesy of Jacob Edwards Library)

The C A Dresser House
A Hotel in Which Southbridge Takes Pride

"As Southbridge is, and has been for years, the business center of an extensive territory, the town has, as a consequence, offered unusual
opportunities fo rthe maintenance of hotels and the number of these and their general excellence has long been a notable feature of the
place. Chief among her hotels of today is the C A Dresser House, built in 1872 after designs by the late Amos P. Cutting of Worcester. The
structure is one of the many enterprises of Chester A Dresser, to whom Southbridge is so greatly indebted for its material growth and
development.

It was a fortunate day for Southbridge when Mr Dresser decided to build the new hotel for it quickened the whole life of the town and led to
renewed activity and development on every hand. The gneral contractor was the late Leonard Cutler, at the time and for years after, the
leading builder and contractor in Southbridge. The site of the hotel is the very center of the business life of the town, the corner of Main and
Central Streets, and from it in a material sense everything radiates. In the construction of the hotel, it was determination to have every
detail and item right as to quality and workmanship. Built of brick with granite trimmings, its five stories make an admirably proportioned
building and one every way pleasing in its architecture. The house has large and excellent office facilities, reading rooms, billiard halls
spacious and attractive parlors, and a dining room of surpassing appointments and artistic decorations. There are 50 chambers, steam heat
throughout, fire-places and combination arc and incandescent lighting. The hotel is said to have cost Mr Dresser above $80,000.

The present landlord of the house is Henry Hay, who has been such since 1890. He is not only a popular and successful landlord, but a
popular citizen of the town, having the esteem and regard of his townspeople asa whole. Although but 47, Mr Hay has been in hotel life 35
years. His parents, Robert and Dolly Hay, were well-known Worcester people and Henry Hay himself has a multitude of friends and
acquaintances in the city, as he was for a long while connected with the Waverly House. His father kept hotels in Greenwich, Waltham,
Niagra Falls and elsewhere. As landlord of the C A Dresser house, Mr Hay does not depend upon the markets for vegetables, but all these
he gets from his own gardens, which are under his personal supervision. Neither does the house depend upon the market for either its
fresh or salt pork for Mr Hay is an expert in the management of pigs and can raise and fatten one to perfection, as his guests from all points
in New England will gladly testify. Indeed, a genuine New England homelike atmosphere pervades the house and this with its good cheer,
have added much to the popularity of the house.

Landlord Hay is intimately identified with secret society life in Worcester and Southbridge. He is a member of Athelstan lodge, F & A M
Worcester Royal Arch chapter, Hiram Council, Worcester County commandery, Knights Templar, lawrence chapter Rose Croix, all of
Worcester; Massachusetts consistory 32 degree Masons, and Apollo temple, Mystic shrine, Boston. He also belongs to Southbridge Lodge,
I.O.O.F., an dis an active member of the Worcester Continentals.
As Southbridge is, and has been for years, the business center of an extensive territory, the town has, as a consequence, offered unusual
opportunities fo rthe maintenance of hotels and the number of these and their general excellence has long been a notable feature of the
place. Chief among her hotels of today is the C A Dresser House, built in 1872 after designs by the late Amos P. Cutting of Worcester. The
structure is one of the many enterprises of Chester A Dresser, to whom Southbridge is so greatly indebted for its material growth and
development.

It was a fortunate day for Southbridge when Mr Dresser decided to build the new hotel for it quickened the whole life of the town and led to
renewed activity and development on every hand. The gneral contractor was the late Leonard Cutler, at the time and for years after, the
leading builder and contractor in Southbridge. The site of the hotel is the very center of the business life of the town, the corner of Main and
Central Streets, and from it in a material sense everything radiates. In the construction of the hotel, it was determination to have every
detail and item right as to quality and workmanship. Built of brick with granite trimmings, its five stories make an admirably proportioned
building and one every way pleasing in its architecture. The house has large and excellent office facilities, reading rooms, billiard halls
spacious and attractive parlors, and a dining room of surpassing appointments and artistic decorations. There are 50 chambers, steam heat
throughout, fire-places and combination arc and incandescent lighting. The hotel is said to have cost Mr Dresser above $80,000.

The present landlord of the house is Henry Hay, who has been such since 1890. He is not only a popular and successful landlord, but a
popular citizen of the town, having the esteem and regard of his townspeople asa whole. Although but 47, Mr Hay has been in hotel life 35
years. His parents, Robert and Dolly Hay, were well-known Worcester people and Henry Hay himself has a multitude of friends and
acquaintances in the city, as he was for a long while connected with the Waverly House. His father kept hotels in Greenwich, Waltham,
Niagra Falls and elsewhere. As landlord of the C A Dresser house, Mr Hay does not depend upon the markets for vegetables, but all these
he gets from his own gardens, which are under his personal supervision. Neither does the house depend upon the market for either its
fresh or salt pork for Mr Hay is an expert in the management of pigs and can raise and fatten one to perfection, as his guests from all points
in New England will gladly testify. Indeed, a genuine New England homelike atmosphere pervades the house and this with its good cheer,
have added much to the popularity of the house.

Landlord Hay is intimately identified with secret society life in Worcester and Southbridge. He is a member of Athelstan lodge, F & A M
Worcester Royal Arch chapter, Hiram Council, Worcester County commandery, Knights Templar, lawrence chapter Rose Croix, all of
Worcester; Massachusetts consistory 32 degree Masons, and Apollo temple, Mystic shrine, Boston. He also belongs to Southbridge Lodge,
I.O.O.F., an dis an active member of the Worcester Continentals."
 
 
 

Why is the Oak Ridge Cemetary Entrance So Narrow?
New Link - Jan 2010
 


 


Post card images from Paul Coiteux's Collection.
 

The Paige & Company Add

Here wass the first from his Southbridge Businesses memorabilia book
(As featured in SEN October 22, 2001 Edition):


 

Extract from The Webster, Dudley, Southbridge and Sturbridge Directory 1896- 1897 -
(Special Thanks to Margaret Morrissey - Jacob Edwards Library for researching the history behind this)

      Paige Carpenter Co.
         Dry Goods, Carpets and Clothing:
      The Oldest, Largest, and most Complete Department Store in this section of Massachusetts.
97, 99 and 101 Main Street, Southbridge

President Calvin DeWitt Paige
Treasurer C V Carpenter

Calvin DeWitt Paige resided in the building where the Southbridge Credit Union is located. Mr Paige
served as Congressional Representative and State Representative for this area. Mr Paige was president of the
Central Cotton Mills Co., The Southbridge Savings Bank and The Edwards Co. Mr Paige died on April 24th,
1930 and is buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery.
 
 
 

Other Paul Coiteux items on this site, but not found here:

AO WWI display of Flags

Southbridge 1966 Sesquicentenial Memorabilia

Envelope from 1916 Southbridge Centenial







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Dick Whitney
Last update Dec 5, 2001